Cedar Point to advocacy group: "Changes are not required"

Posted | Contributed by Jeff

On Thursday, the National Alliance on Mental Illness asked Cedar Point to immediately remove two offerings focusing on fictional mental health patients. The attractions promote the false stereotype that the public should fear mental health patients, the alliance said. But Cedar Point officials feel the attractions do no such thing, park spokesman Robin Innes said.

Read more from The Sandusky Register.

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Vater's avatar

"NAMI Ohio is sad that Cedar Point has rejected our plea," Russell said. "(But) we will not take any further action in regards to Cedar Point. Our energies must be expended in advocating for treatment services that are currently not available."

What a concept. Perhaps that's where their energies should have been expended prior to this ridiculousness.

Rick_UK's avatar

It's provided awareness of their wider cause, that's all they wanted.


Nothing to see here. Move along.

It was cheap PR for NAMI Ohio, it didn't cost them anything but a phone call and some postage.

They wrote a letter during mental health awareness week. Doubt much energy was needed. And I suspect more people know about the letter than know about much of the other things they did during last week to promote awareness. Park is happy because it got some free advertising with a couple of weekends left in the season.

Kick The Sky's avatar

Step 1: Accuse a business of not being politically correct about some facet of their operations.
Step 2: Back down when that business tells you to, "sod off".
Step 3: Profit.


Certain victory.

Vater's avatar

I'm so tired of the word 'awareness'. It grates on my nerves as much as the misuse of 'they're', 'there', and 'their', and the term 'melty cheese.'

What's the difference between this and say a haunted house that revolved around black gangstas from the ghetto? "It's not reality" after all. And I'm guessing that people wouldn't so quickly dismiss that one.

BTW, if you think having a haunted house centered around the mentally ill is a good thing more power to you. Sounds like a friggen riot!

Tekwardo's avatar

It isn't that it isn't reality, it's a different type of scary. Cancer is scary. Gangsters are scary. Mentally ill psychopaths are scary. Which one is marketable? Mentally ill psychopaths.

If Cancer themed haunts were marketable then they'd do that. Same with Gangsters. But they're not. It doesn't matter the reasons behind why they're not, because they're not.


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LostKause's avatar

Cancer and Gansters! That sounds like a few themes in a Church-ran Hell House. lol

Extremely crazy people, as characters, are pretty freekin' scary. It's hard to tell what they'll do. They could think that slicing you from the pelvis to your throat is funny. They can't be reasoned with. If they get out of their straight jacket, you better watch out, because they are extremely crazy.

But the reality is that most mentally ill people are not really that scary, not the ones who are not psychotic anyways. They are just misunderstood, but people fear what they don't understand.

...And if it's scary, I say use it.

Last edited by LostKause,

What's the difference between this and say a haunted house that revolved around black gangstas from the ghetto? "It's not reality" after all. And I'm guessing that people wouldn't so quickly dismiss that one.

My wife, the psychiatrist, never gave this one enough thought to have to dismiss it.


OhioStater's avatar

I'm a licensed therapist that diagnoses and treats the mentally ill everyday. I'm also on the psych. faculty at Mount Union (I'm the roller-coaster exposure therapy prof)

I actually sent a letter to J. Hildebrandt letting him know that not everyone in the mental health field shares the same "passion" as NAMI.

This was ludicrous.

And John wrote back, echoing my sentiments. In his own words, people understand that when they enter the gates for this event, they understand it's all about "show biz".

If you have a problem with these attractions, you are taking life...and this issue...much too seriously.

Jason Hammond's avatar

Kick The Sky said:
Step 1: Accuse a business of not being politically correct about some facet of their operations.

I thought step 1 was collecting underpants.


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CoasterDemon's avatar

^No, it's admitting we were powerless over our Thorazine shuffle ;)


Billy

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