canada's wonderland and passports

Tuesday, October 3, 2006 12:00 PM
^ Unless Halliburton gets the contract! ;)
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Tuesday, October 3, 2006 12:02 PM

Lord Gonchar said:
-A US passport is $97, valid for 10 years and lets you see the world.

-A Cedar Fair Maxx Pass is $125, valid for 1 year and gives you admission to 12 amusement parks.

2 1/2 cents a day for access to the world or 34 cents a day for access to some rides?

Just an observation.


[putting on my "coaster geek / fan boy / smart arse / sarcastic sob" hat]

But... but... but....

The pass port will get you to places like London, Rome, Paris, etc etc etc... It's NOT worth $97.

BUT...

The Max Pass will get you into CEDAR POINT (cue angelic choir)... it's PRICELESS.

[taking off my "coaster geek / fan boy / smart arse / sarcastic SOB" hat]

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Tuesday, October 3, 2006 12:10 PM
^but for that 2 1/2 cents a day, you could feed a family of 3 for a whole year! ;)
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Tuesday, October 3, 2006 3:51 PM
Considering a Conch Republic passport costs $200, that $97 for an American passport doesn't sound too bad.

Give the TSA a few months and they'll probably be requiring passports for domestic flights anyway.

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Tuesday, October 3, 2006 4:08 PM
They are now planning to put off the implimentation of the new rules until 2009 for land crossings between the US and Canada and Mexico.

The big problem is for someone that just wants to make a single crossing during the 10 years for some reason such as visiting a theme park, going to some tourist attraction (eg. Niagara Falls), etc. Nearly $100 is too much for one crossing and this would basically cause many people in such situations to decide that it is not worth the cost.

Currently the only cost for crossing the border is the toll if you use a bridge or tunnel. If that changes, the casual one-time tourist going just over the border to Canada or Mexico (especially if with a family) will very likely change travel plans.

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Tuesday, October 3, 2006 4:13 PM
It's around $40 for a Canadian passport.
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Tuesday, October 3, 2006 4:30 PM
^ Um, $87 actually.
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Tuesday, October 3, 2006 4:46 PM
A passport is a great thing to have, if only to be able to take advantage of some of the ridiculous airfares that sometimes pop up for interesting places at unusual times. For example, it's surprisingly cheap to fly overseas for Thanksgiving.

I keep thinking that a Thanksgiving spent in Disneyland Paris or Tokyo would be fun...

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Tuesday, October 3, 2006 4:53 PM

PCW said:
It's around $40 for a Canadian passport.

Well, between that and not having to pay for medical insurance, I'm sold. How does one become Canadian? (does it hurt much?) :)

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Tuesday, October 3, 2006 5:26 PM

Odd Todd said:
^ Um, $87 actually.

oh my bad, lol it was 40 for the childrens passport (ages 3-15), which is why I thought it was the price since when I got my passport when I was 12.

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Tuesday, October 3, 2006 8:10 PM

Brian Noble said:
I keep thinking that a Thanksgiving spent in Disneyland Paris or Tokyo would be fun...

It would at that. Hmmmm...

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Thursday, October 5, 2006 12:15 PM
I see no problem with passports. Like Gator I figure I will need one to see the world eventually. ;)

Hey, and I LIKE Gonch's logic. :)

I have had a little harrassment getting into Canada, but it makes for great stories............

"Yes ma'am, I am from West Virginia and drove all this way just to visit Canada's Wonderland. Yes, I am a coaster enthusiast."

PULL OVER HERE!

I always learned that telling the truth usually works. If you have nothing to hide then you have nothing to worry about. ;)

Still, that was the LONGEST hour of my life getting through the border. Last year when I went up there I didn't have any problems. :) Actually I don't even think they asked for our ID's the first time we went over. The dude was more worried about his lunch than playing 1000 questions. :)

-Tina

*** Edited 10/5/2006 4:16:57 PM UTC by coasterqueenTRN***

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Thursday, October 5, 2006 12:19 PM
^ But if you looked at the sandwich he was holding, you'd understand... ;)

Yummmmmmm! :)

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Thursday, October 5, 2006 1:07 PM
Usually it's not getting INTO Canada that's the problem. They usually have an open-door policy. Hell, just tell them you are going to gamble & they'll buy it.

It's coming BACK from Canada that the issues arise, from the US Customs agents. They're pricks with attitudes that think they're above the law. I don't answer the truth because the truth doesn't set me free! It gets me in deeper sh!t because they think it's odd for some reason. So again, I just said I went gambling my life away, despite me only stepping into a casnio to exchange from US to Candian dollars.

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Thursday, October 5, 2006 3:50 PM
My fraternity brother at the Nogales border crossing, returning from a Spring Break hedonism binge in Mazatlan:

Border Guard: "Do you have anything to declare?"

Fraternity Brother: "I'm tired, hung over, haven't showered in several days, and I cheated on my girlfriend."

Border Guard, smirking: "Welcome back to the U.S., son."

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Thursday, October 5, 2006 10:16 PM

coasterqueenTRN said:
I am from West Virginia and drove all this way just to visit Canada's Wonderland. Yes, I am a coaster enthusiast."

Keep it simple applies to border crossings. The more elaborate your answer, the more you draw attention.

I always just go with "Sightseeing..." If they ask you to elaborate (they usually don't), THEN you say "Oh, maybe I'll check out that Canada's Wonderland park..." Never had a problem.

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