Butterfly Turn VS. Cobra Roll

Monday, November 26, 2001 7:52 AM
Roller coaster database calls the inversion on Raptor a "Cobra roll" and i'm assuming its the inversion in this picture -

http://www.rcdb.com/installationgallery1.htm?Picture=6

The inversion on Deja Vu has been called a "Butterfly turn" or "Boomerang".  I'm also assuming its the inversion in this picture -

http://www.rcdb.com/installationgallery746.htm?Picture=4

Whats the diff? 

+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 7:59 AM
As far as I know, the differnece is the manufacturer...they name them as they please...hence, the "giga-coaster"...
-----------------
the buzzer formerly known as gatorwoodie
Son of Drop Zone - PKI CoasterCamp I Champions!!!
+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 8:15 AM
On the same wavelength, B&M call the corkscrews on their inverted coasters flat spins. Everyone else just calls them corkscrews.

I've also noticed the boomerang\butterfly\cobra roll element on Drachen Fire is called a Batwing.

-------------
Gravity is your friend!

*** This post was edited by go with gravity on 11/26/2001. ***

+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 8:23 AM
funny, I thought the cobra roll was the element on the top right of the Raptor picture.

Liz

-------------
"The only real limit to height is what people are willing to get on." - Ron Toomer

+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 8:46 AM
Liz, I believe that's what is generally called a "heartline", but I could easily be mistaken...
-----------------
the buzzer formerly known as gatorwoodie
Son of Drop Zone - PKI CoasterCamp I Champions!!!
+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 8:51 AM
ah, yes.....I've heard that term too. I guess I always thought that something with the word "roll" in it, would be an element like that, not like the Batwing/Boomerang/Butterfly/Cobra. heh, learn something new everyday! thanks.....

Liz

-------------
"The only real limit to height is what people are willing to get on." - Ron Toomer

+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 9:13 AM

rollergator said:
I believe that's what is generally called a "heartline", but I could easily be mistaken...

No, I think B&M calls that a zero-g roll but Intamin calls it a heartline.  Usually Intamin's version is more of a heartline like on Volcano @ PKD.  But a true heartline is more like a togo heartline.

-----------------
I tried to sign my name here but the ink didn't stay on the screen.

+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 9:17 AM
Looks kinda iffy! :)

-------------
CAK91687
Visit my site at www.geocities.com/cak91687/Amusement_Park_Central.html

+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 9:18 AM
Liz, the "cobra roll" is so named because, well, it looks like a cobra rearing up flaring its hood.
-----------------
--Greg
"Beat the rush, sign up for your post-Mean Streak MRI now..."
My page  My other page  And my coaster page
+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 9:23 AM
B&M calls it a zero-g roll.  on B&M inverteds, a corkscrew is called a wingover while on all other B&M coasters its called a flat spin.  the difference between anything like that is the manufacture's preference.
-----------------
Knott's Berry Farm Cuba ~South Park
+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 9:51 AM
I actually looked into this quite a bit and here's what I found.

The names of the elements differ by manufacturer.


Examples:


B&M's "cobra roll", Vekoma's "boomerang" and Arrow's "batwing" are all the same thing.


Arrow's "boomerang" and B&M's "batwing" are the same element.


B&M refers to corkscrews as "wingovers" on inverteds and as "flat spins" on sit downs.


"Inline Twists" or "Zero-G Rolls" are the same and used quite liberally. In general I find that most people consider it an "Inline Twist" on an inverted and a "Zero-G Roll" on a sit down. Ironically I often see the twist shown in that raptor photo referred to as a "camelback" on B&M sit downs (such as Kumba) which is weird because I always knew camelbacks as airtime hills or "bunny hops" as in the end parts of Magnum or Steel Force.


There is no industry standard in naming these elements.


Any further questions?
 
.

*** This post was edited by Lord Gonchar on 11/26/2001. ***

+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 10:08 AM
Yeah, one more question dude.

Seeing how you've got the knowin'......

Do you know where I left my car keys?

~Tocci

+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 10:10 AM
Yes..  just one..

Do you hit the first syllable as in GON-char, or the second..  as in gon-CHAR..

That will be all for now.

-----------------
Homey G, proud founder of the CCC. Join up now! :oÞ

+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 10:15 AM
I'm glad you guys got the humor in that. It could've been taken as a "know it all" sort of rant.

Tocci - you're keys are where you'd least expect them to be.

Homey G - I hit the first syllable hard. GON-char

+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 10:20 AM
Gonchar: they call the zero-g roll on Kumba a camel back because that's what it is in effect.  when it debueted, it was the world's first camel back inversion or something.  BGT asked for a camel back only they also wanted an inversion, I think, and B&M gave them a zero-g roll.
-----------------
Knott's Berry Farm Cuba ~South Park
+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 10:26 AM
Well that makes sense, coasterjedi! I always knew B&M's camelback was essentially an inline twists at the top of a large hill but I never thought about it that way.

Look at that Raptor pic again. The twist in that photo is at the top of a large hill. I wonder why it's referred to as a Zero-G Roll instead of a camelback inversion?

Anyone know?

+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 11:06 AM

Lord Gonchar said:
"Look at that Raptor pic again. The twist in that photo is at the top of a large hill. I wonder why it's referred to as a Zero-G Roll instead of a camelback inversion?

Anyone know?"



I dont *know*, but it has always been my opinion that the "inline twists" on inverted coasters are NOT "zero-G" in any way shape or form. In fact, they seem to me to provide more positive Gs than anything (especially on the Batman inverteds). On the other hand, the "inline twists" on the sitdowns (e.g. Kumba) *do* give a 'weightless' feeling. But once again, that is simply my opinion and should only be taken as such.
ciao,
moi
+0
Monday, November 26, 2001 11:07 AM
i thought "vs." forums weren't allowed.
-----------------
Up Your Nose With a Rubber Hose!
+0
Tuesday, November 27, 2001 8:51 PM


2Hostyl said:
I dont *know*, but it has always been my opinion that the "inline twists" on inverted coasters are NOT "zero-G" in any way shape or form. In fact, they seem to me to provide more positive Gs than anything (especially on the Batman inverteds). On the other hand, the "inline twists" on the sitdowns (e.g. Kumba) *do* give a 'weightless' feeling.

 
I agree with you that most of the B&M inverted "zero-G rolls" have positive G's, but Volcano has the ultimate Zero-G rolls.  Intamin figured out that if you slow down the rate of rotation through the roll, the rider just hangs in the harness for a true weightless feeling.  I think the slow roll is much better, although being whipped into your seat by a B&M is fun too.
 
Also, the way I understand things there are 3 types of rolls, although I don't know all of the aliases.
1) Inline twist: a straight piece of track twisted like a Twizzler (no horizontal or vetical movement).  Designed to keep your feet close to the axis of rotation (on a sit-down).
2) Corkscrew: very curved track twisted like a corkscrew (duh) with lots of horizontal and vertical movement.  Designed to keep your head closest to the axis of rotation (on a sit-down).
3) Heartline twist (aka barrel roll?): a small diameter corkscrew designed to keep your heart (or center of gravity) closest to the axis of rotation.
 
I know the heartline twist has been talked about for years, but I can't think of any existing coasters that actually have one.  Anyone know of any?


+0
Tuesday, November 27, 2001 8:59 PM
Raptors last corkscrew is more of a heartline twist and SLC and Intamin Inverts also have heartline twists.
-----------------
Does CCI know how to make a bad coaster?
+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2018, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...