B&M Transfer Tables and Storage

Sunday, February 23, 2003 9:10 PM
If you look at most any photo of B&M transfer tracks and stroage tracks, they arent really made of tracks at all but yet little wheels right in the center of where the trains brake spine would be. What are those for and how do trains stay on there?

http://www.twistedrails.com/sfmm2k3/feb22-06.shtml

If you look closely you can see it in this photo.
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If practice makes perfect but noone is perfect, then why practice.

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Sunday, February 23, 2003 10:22 PM
As you can see here and here, the transfer track does have real track. The storage track doesn't have real tracks in order to reduce the pressure on the wheels, and make maintenance a bit easier.

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Dutch Coastin' :: European coasters, thrills and theming!

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Monday, February 24, 2003 1:42 AM
Perhaps they haven't installed the stoage track yet. No Transfer track would have to be normal track, becasue its part of the circuit the rest of the time.

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So you believe that you are studying us, then kindly explain why you are the ones trapped in your seats.


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Monday, February 24, 2003 3:29 AM
he means the track in the storage shed, and hes right thers one ster of guides at it enters the shed and then its just tires the whole stretch of track, no rails at all. How do the trains stay on?
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Monday, February 24, 2003 4:03 AM
There are tiny wheels on the guidance rails on which the train stands.

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Dutch Coastin' :: European coasters, thrills and theming!

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Monday, February 24, 2003 4:03 AM
Normally, the B&M storage tracks have angle-iron track outboard of where the track would normally attach...the trains have small caster wheels positioned at the outboard edges of the vehicles, outboard of the normal wheel sets. These small outboard wheels ride on the angle-iron track and hold the train stable on the storage track. This keeps the road wheel assemblies completely clear so that all 96 (or 108 or 120) road, guide, and upstop wheels are accessible for maintenance.

--Dave Althoff, Jr.

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Monday, February 24, 2003 11:14 AM
Yep, I have noticed this on Nitro. Here is a good picture of it: http://www.coastergallery.com/1999/GA71.html
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Monday, February 24, 2003 11:36 AM
Here's another one of Nitro where you can clearly see the angle irons that the smaller wheels run on, leaving the main wheel sets available for maintenance. http://www.rcdb.com/installationgallery1106.htm?Picture=3

You can also see the caster wheels here on Montu http://www.rcdb.com/installationgallery87.htm?Picture=17 they are the little black wheels on the far outside of the train (above the seats and below the decorative wheel covers)

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--George H
---Superman the ride...coming to a SF park near you soon...
Currency tracking experiment... http://www.wheresgeorge.com (Referring to The "George" on the $1 bill - Not Me)

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Monday, February 24, 2003 6:07 PM
Hmm, I never noticed or realized those where there when I shot that pic of Montu. It makes perfect sense when maintaining in place.

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C0astin' Carl
ULTIMATECOASTER.com - In Search of the "Ultimate" Thrill

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Monday, February 24, 2003 8:14 PM
Thats what I thought they were for I just never got how they worked. Ive been on Mantis and got to see it up close however I couldnt find any good pics of it clearly.

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If practice makes perfect but noone is perfect, then why practice.

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